Poverty

CPBB chartIssue Spotlight: The War on Poverty at 50

It has been 50 years since the United States began the War on Poverty. Much progress has been made, but much remains to be done.

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Commentary: It's time to renew our War on Poverty

Resources on the War on Poverty's 50th Anniversary

Recession Fallout: Poverty Rates Up, Median Income Down from 2007 to 2012 in Many Parts of PA

Blog: Don't Give Up The Fight

Browse Poverty Publications Below

February 2, 2016 (Harrisburg, PA) – A diverse coalition of organizations today released a letter to the governor and members of the General Assembly, “A 2016-17 Budget for Pennsylvania’s Future,” that recommends ways to fairly raise taxes to increase investments in education and workforce development, promote shared prosperity, protect those in need, protect the environment, reform the criminal justice system, and revitalize democracy.

On Tuesday, February 2, 2016, thirty-three organizations, including the Pennsylvania Budget and Polivy Center, sent a memo to Governor Tom Wolf and the members of the General Assembly of Pennsylvania with recommendations for the 2016-17 state budget. The groups call for completion of 2015-16 budget, and a 2016-17 budget that raises additional revenue to close the structural deficit and make necessary investments in vital programs.

The ideas in this document were compiled by the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center based on our own work and that of our partner, the Keystone Research Center, and that of advocates on many issues. The names of our partners are in our letter to the Governor and the members of the General Assembly.

(HARRISBURG, Pa.) – Aug. 26, 2015 –The Pennsylvania legislature needs to buckle down and finally start working on a sustainable state budget, a coalition of human services and budget groups said in a press conference in the Capitol Rotunda the morning after the House took a series of unsuccessful and likely unconstitutional line-item veto override votes on the budget passed at the end of June. Gov. Wolf vetoed that budget in its entirety on June 30, after introducing in March his own budget proposal, which the General Assembly’s leadership failed to seriously consider.

View detailed data on student poverty concentration by school district.

New Census data shows that poverty remains stubbornly high in Pennsylvania, and residents in many areas have not recovered income losses following the Great Recession.

These bar charts compare the poverty and child poverty rates in Pennsylvania and the United States.

This chart, based on U.S. Census data, compares poverty and median income by county for the years 2007 and 2013.

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