Publications

The Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center produces a variety of reports, policy briefs, and other publications on state budget and tax policy, health care policy, education policy, poverty and public welfare, the economy, and several related issues. Below is an archive of all PBPC publications to date.

Browse by Issue: You can also browse PBPC publications by the following issue areas:

Tax and Budget     |     Education     |     Health and Family Security     |     PA Economy     |     Democracy

This brief looks at the different ways property tax relief can be structured in Pennsylvania and why for lower- and middle-income homeowners, homestead relief provides more bang for the buck than millage rate cuts.

This is PBPC's press statement on the Independent Fiscal Office Initial 2015-16 Revenue Estimate and how it relates to efforts to increase education funding and fix the commonwealth's structural deficit.

March 25, 2015

PBPC hosted its annual Pennsylvania Budget Summit in Harrisburg, providing an in-depth look at the state and federal budget plans and what they mean for communities and families across Pennsylvania. Check out online resources from the Summit.

January 26, 2015

Our national report released by the Economic Analysis Research Network (EARN) and the Economic Policy Institute presents updated estimates of top incomes from 1917 to 2012 for all 50 U.S. states and multi-state regions. (See the national report at http://goo.gl/AnFnMt). This brief expands on the Pennsylvania findings of the national report and presents updates by county and metropolitan area on trends in the share of income earned by the top 1 percent in 1978 and 2012.

 

HARRISBURG, Pa. (Jan. 14, 2015) – Pennsylvania’s ranking worsened on a biennial report card measuring the fairness of state and local taxes, according to a study released today by the Institute on Taxation and Economic Policy and the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center.

Middle-income Pennsylvanians pay two times more in taxes as a share of income than the wealthiest earners, and the lowest-income earners pay three times more, the study found. Pennsylvanians in the top 1 percent of income actually saw a slight drop in the share of income they pay in taxes, from 4.4 percent in 2013 to 4.2 percent in 2015.

January 7, 2015

December revenue collections were better than expected, coming in $162 million higher than the December revenue target. This pushes the 2014-15 revenue surplus to $271 million, or 2.1%.

While having more money is better than having less money when trying to balance the state budget, the current 2014-15 revenue surplus pales in comparison to the $2 billion shortfall projected for 2015-16.

December 16, 2014

Summary and PowerPoint presentation from the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center's "The Road Ahead in PA: 2015 Economic & Budget Outlook" Luncheon in Harrisburg.

Monthly archive