Publications

The Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center produces a variety of reports, policy briefs, and other publications on state budget and tax policy, health care policy, education policy, poverty and public welfare, the economy, and several related issues. Below is an archive of all PBPC publications to date.

Browse by Issue: You can also browse PBPC publications by the following issue areas:

Tax and Budget     |     Education     |     Health and Family Security     |     PA Economy     |     Democracy

February 2, 2016 (Harrisburg, PA) – A diverse coalition of organizations today released a letter to the governor and members of the General Assembly, “A 2016-17 Budget for Pennsylvania’s Future,” that recommends ways to fairly raise taxes to increase investments in education and workforce development, promote shared prosperity, protect those in need, protect the environment, reform the criminal justice system, and revitalize democracy.

On Tuesday, February 2, 2016, thirty-three organizations, including the Pennsylvania Budget and Polivy Center, sent a memo to Governor Tom Wolf and the members of the General Assembly of Pennsylvania with recommendations for the 2016-17 state budget. The groups call for completion of 2015-16 budget, and a 2016-17 budget that raises additional revenue to close the structural deficit and make necessary investments in vital programs.

The ideas in this document were compiled by the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center based on our own work and that of our partner, the Keystone Research Center, and that of advocates on many issues. The names of our partners are in our letter to the Governor and the members of the General Assembly.

February 1, 2016 (Harrisburg, Pa.) –  In the context of Pennsylvania’s still-unfinished 2015-16 state budget, the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center (PBPC) today released a detailed analysis of three competing budget proposals put forward last year – the governor’s original 2015-16 proposal, the compromise budget, SB 1073, and the Republican bill, HB 1460, that passed both chambers and the governor blue-line vetoed in December.

Budget numbers are always difficult to understand, not least because those with different perspectives can present the numbers in sharply different, but honest ways. In the context of the state’s still-unfinished 2105-16 budget, this brief presents a series of careful “apples-to-apples” comparisons of the three budgets in play in Harrisburg last year: Governor Wolf’s budget proposal, the Republican budget and the bi-partisan budget agreed to by Governor Wolf and the leaders of the Democratic and Republican parties in the General Assembly.

HARRISBURG, Pa. (Dec. 19, 2015) – Marc Stier, Director of the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center, made the following statement in response to the failure of the pension reform bill in the state House of Representatives and Majority Leader Dave Reed’s announcement that the House will vote tomorrow on a stop gap budget.

December 14, 2015 (Harrisburg, Pa.) – In a memo to members of the state House of Representatives, Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center Director Marc Stier urged the General Assembly to "live up to fundamental democratic norms and strip provisions added to the Fiscal and School Codes at the last minute and behind closed doors."

In a democracy, public policy is ideally made after extensive public deliberation and debate. Deals made in private and announced at the last minute make it impossible for citizens to understand and evaluate the actions of their legislators or for advocates to mobilize citizen opinion on the critical issues of the day. Unfortunately, the last few days have given us two striking examples of the failure to live up to this fundamental democratic norm.

Monthly archive