Tax and Budget

Issue Spotlight: 2015-16 Budget

Governor Tom Wolf proposed a $29.9 billion 2015-16 budget proposal on March 3. Here is the latest.

Budget Analysis: Proposed 2015-16 Plan to Increase School Funding With Sustainable Revenues

Mid-Year Review: A Review of the 2014-15 Budget Six Months into the Fiscal Year

Revenue Update: Revenues through March Higher than Estimate, but Show Impact of Corporate Tax Cuts

Enacted 2014-15 Budget Funding: General Fund Program Totals - Post Line-Item Vetoes

Browse Tax and Budget Publications Below

HARRISBURG, Pa. – Oct. 7, 2015 -- A diverse coalition of groups -- including unions, human service organizations and environmental and educational advocates – urged members of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives to vote today for Gov. Wolf’s revenue package. At a 10 a.m. press conference in the Capitol Rotunda before the vote, speakers said the commonwealth needs more revenue to reinvest in education, restart the state’s economy, fund vital programs for vulnerable Pennsylvanians and balance the budget.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Oct. 7, 2015

The Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center urges members of Pennsylvania’s House of Representatives to support the revenue package coming up for consideration today in their chamber. Voting for the package requires both political courage to do the difficult but right thing and common sense to see the obvious. Pennsylvania needs more revenue coming in to meet its obligations, close its structural deficit, protect its vulnerable citizens and make the kind of investment in education that voters want and every school child deserves.

Over the past few years, many other states, similar to Pennsylvania in 2011 and again today, have faced critical choices about whether to raise state revenues, hold firm to “no new taxes” or even cut taxes further. We examine the experience of four other states as well as Pennsylvania. Two of the other states – California and Minnesota – raised taxes to improve their fiscal health and to reinvest in education. The other two states – Kansas and Wisconsin – followed the same path as Pennsylvania under Gov. Corbett, cutting taxes in varying degrees and cutting education spending.

HARRISBURG, Pa. (Sept. 29, 2015) -- The Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center issued the following statement, by Executive Director Stephen Herzenberg, after Gov. Wolf vetoed today the stopgap budget sent to him by the legislature:

“Gov. Wolf did the right thing in vetoing the stopgap budget. Short-term, inadequate funding for schools and human services would eliminate any pressure on the legislature to shift from the failed policies of the past four years that undermined educational opportunity, sabotaged the state’s economic recovery and left the state’s fiscal house in disorder.

(HARRISBURG, Pa.) -- Sept. 16, 2015 --Harrisburg has become preoccupied with budget process and tactics in recent weeks. But what Pennsylvanians need is a good budget outcome – a budget that reinvests in education, jobs and communities using revenues from a severance tax, provides property tax relief and puts the state’s fiscal house in order.

To refocus attention on the key budget choices that legislators and Gov. Wolf must make, the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center launched “Why the Budget Matters – Let’s Count the Ways.”

(HARRISBURG, Pa.) – Aug. 25, 2015 -- Dr. Stephen Herzenberg, of the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center, issued the following statement after line-item veto override votes on the Republican budget failed in the Pennsylvania House.

“Now that several likely unconstitutional line-item veto override votes in the Pennsylvania House have failed, seven weeks after Gov. Wolf vetoed the Republican budget in its entirety, it’s time for the General Assembly’s leadership to finally get down to the real business of seriously negotiating a sustainable state budget. This budget must restore education funding, solve Pennsylvania’s structural budget deficit and invest in the state’s economic recovery.

(HARRISBURG, Pa.) -- July 28, 2015 – A new three-part report from the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center suggests that similarities between the Wolf and House (HB 504) property tax relief proposals should make this a logical area of compromise between the Governor and General Assembly. PBPC, a project of the Keystone Research Center, also provides the first comparative numbers on how much tax relief the Wolf and House plans would provide to typical homeowners in each school district, results which may surprise many supporters of HB 504.

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