Property Taxes

Issue Spotlight: Property Tax Reform

Legislative proposals to eliminate property taxes in Pennsylvania have gained steam in the Legislature, posing a serious threat to stable, predictable education funding. Most of the proposals currently before the General Assembly do not address the primary issue with property taxes in Pennsylvania — that too few state dollars are used to support public schools in the commonwealth. Pennsylvania can help seniors and working families having trouble paying their property taxes with better targeted strategies while still protecting critical investments in public education.

Take Action: Join Pennsylvania Taxpayers for Good Public Schools

Property Taxes in PA: Read About Major Property Tax Issues and Solutions

IFO Resources: Read the Independent Fiscal Office's Analysis of Leading Property Tax Bills

Business Opposition: Read a Letter from Business Groups Opposing Property Tax Elimination

Browse Property Tax Publications Below

The Wolf Budget and a Republican House Proposal Would Both Provide Significant Property Tax Relief and Increase the State Share of School Funding

Yet despite potential for compromise, the Republican budget includes no property tax relief

(HARRISBURG, Pa.) -- Sept. 16, 2015 --Harrisburg has become preoccupied with budget process and tactics in recent weeks. But what Pennsylvanians need is a good budget outcome – a budget that reinvests in education, jobs and communities using revenues from a severance tax, provides property tax relief and puts the state’s fiscal house in order.

To refocus attention on the key budget choices that legislators and Gov. Wolf must make, the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center launched “Why the Budget Matters – Let’s Count the Ways.”

(HARRISBURG, Pa.) – Aug. 25, 2015 -- Dr. Stephen Herzenberg, of the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center, issued the following statement after line-item veto override votes on the Republican budget failed in the Pennsylvania House.

“Now that several likely unconstitutional line-item veto override votes in the Pennsylvania House have failed, seven weeks after Gov. Wolf vetoed the Republican budget in its entirety, it’s time for the General Assembly’s leadership to finally get down to the real business of seriously negotiating a sustainable state budget. This budget must restore education funding, solve Pennsylvania’s structural budget deficit and invest in the state’s economic recovery.

(HARRISBURG, Pa.) -- July 28, 2015 – A new three-part report from the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center suggests that similarities between the Wolf and House (HB 504) property tax relief proposals should make this a logical area of compromise between the Governor and General Assembly. PBPC, a project of the Keystone Research Center, also provides the first comparative numbers on how much tax relief the Wolf and House plans would provide to typical homeowners in each school district, results which may surprise many supporters of HB 504.

(HARRISBURG, PA) June 30, 2015 -- Dr. Mark Price, an economist and interim research director of the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center, issued the following statement in response to the Pennsylvania Senate’s passage today of HB 1192, which now goes to Gov. Wolf for his consideration:

“We are disappointed that House and Senate Republicans approved a 2015-16 state budget plan that will prolong the failed, cuts-only approach to governing pursued under the previous administration. Apparently, no lessons have been learned from Pennsylvania’s poor economic performance over the past four years. Nor does this budget reflect the will of the majority of Pennsylvanians to fully restore state funding recently cut from education, provide property tax relief and enact a severance tax on gas drillers profiting from our natural resources.

Therefore, we urge Gov. Wolf to veto this ill-advised, hastily conceived and unilaterally developed budget.

 

(HARRISBURG, Pa.) – June 28, 2015 -- The 2015-16 proposed budget passed in a party-line vote by the Pennsylvania House yesterday, and under consideration by the Pennsylvania Senate tonight, continues to rely on the kind of one-time revenue sources and budget fixes that have patched together the state’s last four budgets and that have led to repeated downgrades of the state’s bond rating.

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