Health Care

Issue Spotlight: The Path To Healthy PA

Covering Low-Income Uninsured Pennsylvanians: The Path to and from Healthy Pennsylvania

Learn More: Medicaid Expansion and the Affordable Care Act

Commentary: Governor's Healthy PA Plan Not Such a Great Deal for Pennsylvanians

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The Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA or Obamacare) is one of the most important pieces of domestic legislation enacted since the 1960s. It has had a dramatic impact in reshaping the provision of health care in the United States at a time when health care amounts to 18% of the United States economy. 

 

This report aims to quantify the benefits of the ACA to Pennsylvanians, in part by showing just how costly repeal of it will be.


In his budget address, Governor Wolf observed that Pennsylvania faces a choice of two paths. Taking one path would require us to deal with the reality of our structural deficit and raise revenues to close it. It would enable government to continue to meet its responsibilities to educate our children, serve those who need our help, protect the environment and encourage economic growth. Taking the other path would require us to accept devastating cuts to education and health and human services.

February 2, 2016 (Harrisburg, PA) – A diverse coalition of organizations today released a letter to the governor and members of the General Assembly, “A 2016-17 Budget for Pennsylvania’s Future,” that recommends ways to fairly raise taxes to increase investments in education and workforce development, promote shared prosperity, protect those in need, protect the environment, reform the criminal justice system, and revitalize democracy.

On Tuesday, February 2, 2016, thirty-three organizations, including the Pennsylvania Budget and Polivy Center, sent a memo to Governor Tom Wolf and the members of the General Assembly of Pennsylvania with recommendations for the 2016-17 state budget. The groups call for completion of 2015-16 budget, and a 2016-17 budget that raises additional revenue to close the structural deficit and make necessary investments in vital programs.

The ideas in this document were compiled by the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center based on our own work and that of our partner, the Keystone Research Center, and that of advocates on many issues. The names of our partners are in our letter to the Governor and the members of the General Assembly.

As of December 10, 2015, the 2015-16 Pennsylvania Budget is still not done. Two different budgets are now before the General Assembly. In this brief, we provide an overview of the differences between the two budgets, looking first at critical differences in spending for education and human services, then at the impact of those differences, and finally at some subtleties in how the two budgets organize  and present certain spending choices they have in common and how this affects the bottom line budget numbers

Wolf Budget Begins to Restore Funding Cut from Mental Health Services

Republican budget maintains mental health funding cuts

March 25, 2015

PBPC hosted its annual Pennsylvania Budget Summit in Harrisburg, providing an in-depth look at the state and federal budget plans and what they mean for communities and families across Pennsylvania. Check out online resources from the Summit.

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