Education

Education Funding (Less Pensions) Still Below 2008-09 LevelsIssue Spotlight: 2014-15 PA Education Budget

The proposed 2014-15 budget provides no increase in the basic education subsidy line, leaving that allocation at $5.5 billion. Instead, the plan adds $251 million in other new classroom funding, which is still $430 million below 2010-11.

Budget Analysis: Education Funding in the 2014-15 Budget

Education Facts: Data on School Enrollment, Poverty, and Education Funding

Budget Summit: Resources from PBPC's 2014 PA Budget Summit

June 2013 Poll: School Cuts Top Concern for Pennsylvania Voters

Browse Education Publications Below

 

(HARRISBURG, Pa.) – June 28, 2015 -- The 2015-16 proposed budget passed in a party-line vote by the Pennsylvania House yesterday, and under consideration by the Pennsylvania Senate tonight, continues to rely on the kind of one-time revenue sources and budget fixes that have patched together the state’s last four budgets and that have led to repeated downgrades of the state’s bond rating.

(HARRISBURG, PA) June 27, 2015 – Mark Price, research director of the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center,* issued the following statement in response to House Bill 1192, the General Appropriations bill, which the Pennsylvania House of Representatives is debating today:

“This budget is essentially Gov. Corbett’s fifth budget. It resurrects a failed, cuts-only approach to the budget that has been discredited by Pennsylvania’s experience over the last four years, in the vain hope that by doing the same thing again we will produce a different outcome. Pennsylvania’s recent poor economic performance can be directly attributed to this failed approach.

Instead, I encourage members of the General Assembly to look at the latest polls to see what’s important to Pennsylvania voters. Voters want to see restoration of education funding, property tax relief and a tax on drilling.

On Thursday afternoon the official Twitter feed for the Pennsylvania House Republicans began circulating an infographic noting that Philadelphia would get 32 percent of the increase in school funding proposed by Gov. Wolf and asked the question “Do you want to pay a huge tax hike to support that plan?”

One critical value that should guide tax policy in our view is “revenue adequacy” – having enough revenue to invest in essential public goods, starting with education, and in services critical to quality of life for middle‐ and low‐income families.

 

(HARRISBURG, Pa.) June 10, 2015 – A diverse array of 41 major organizations, which serve or represent millions of Pennsylvanians, today called on state lawmakers to enact a fair and reasonable tax on the extraction of natural gas and use the revenue to reinvest in Pennsylvania’s public schools, promote economic development and clean energy, and strengthen oversight of the natural gas industry.

(HARRISBURG, PA)With state budget negotiations heating up in Harrisburg, for the first time new information-packed fact sheets are being released by the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center that reveal the real impact of Gov. Wolf's budget plan on taxpayers, homeowners, schoolchildren, minimum wage workers and other Pennsylvanians who would be affected by his proposals.

"Pennsylvania is now the second largest natural gas producer in the country," testified Research Director Michael Wood before a Senate Joint Committee,"and it is time to end the excuses and enact a real severance tax."  

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