Higher Education

Wages Are Higher for Better Educated WorkersIssue Spotlight: Investing in Education & the Economy

There is a strong link between the educational attainment of a state’s workforce and both productivity and workers’ pay, according to a new study from the Economic Analysis and Research Network (EARN). Expanding access to high-quality education will create more economic opportunity for Pennsylvania residents and do more to strengthen the state’s overall economy than anything else.

Investing in Education: Read a Press Release on the Study

Browse Higher Education Publications Below

On Tuesday, February 2, 2016, thirty-three organizations, including the Pennsylvania Budget and Polivy Center, sent a memo to Governor Tom Wolf and the members of the General Assembly of Pennsylvania with recommendations for the 2016-17 state budget. The groups call for completion of 2015-16 budget, and a 2016-17 budget that raises additional revenue to close the structural deficit and make necessary investments in vital programs.

The ideas in this document were compiled by the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center based on our own work and that of our partner, the Keystone Research Center, and that of advocates on many issues. The names of our partners are in our letter to the Governor and the members of the General Assembly.

February 1, 2016 (Harrisburg, Pa.) –  In the context of Pennsylvania’s still-unfinished 2015-16 state budget, the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center (PBPC) today released a detailed analysis of three competing budget proposals put forward last year – the governor’s original 2015-16 proposal, the compromise budget, SB 1073, and the Republican bill, HB 1460, that passed both chambers and the governor blue-line vetoed in December.

Budget numbers are always difficult to understand, not least because those with different perspectives can present the numbers in sharply different, but honest ways. In the context of the state’s still-unfinished 2105-16 budget, this brief presents a series of careful “apples-to-apples” comparisons of the three budgets in play in Harrisburg last year: Governor Wolf’s budget proposal, the Republican budget and the bi-partisan budget agreed to by Governor Wolf and the leaders of the Democratic and Republican parties in the General Assembly.

As of December 10, 2015, the 2015-16 Pennsylvania Budget is still not done. Two different budgets are now before the General Assembly. In this brief, we provide an overview of the differences between the two budgets, looking first at critical differences in spending for education and human services, then at the impact of those differences, and finally at some subtleties in how the two budgets organize  and present certain spending choices they have in common and how this affects the bottom line budget numbers

Wolf Budget Would Help Stem Higher Education Tuition Hikes

Republican budget would continue PA’s underinvestment in higher education, sabotaging opportunity, long-run growth and quality of life

(HARRISBURG, Pa.) -- Sept. 16, 2015 --Harrisburg has become preoccupied with budget process and tactics in recent weeks. But what Pennsylvanians need is a good budget outcome – a budget that reinvests in education, jobs and communities using revenues from a severance tax, provides property tax relief and puts the state’s fiscal house in order.

To refocus attention on the key budget choices that legislators and Gov. Wolf must make, the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center launched “Why the Budget Matters – Let’s Count the Ways.”

 

(HARRISBURG, Pa.) – June 28, 2015 -- The 2015-16 proposed budget passed in a party-line vote by the Pennsylvania House yesterday, and under consideration by the Pennsylvania Senate tonight, continues to rely on the kind of one-time revenue sources and budget fixes that have patched together the state’s last four budgets and that have led to repeated downgrades of the state’s bond rating.

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